CNN 10 with subtitles | February 28, 2017 | Donald Trump and his upcoming budget propos...


source: Daily Listening    2017年2月27日
CNN 10 | February 28, 2017 | Donald Trump and his upcoming budget proposal | Daily Listening hightlights: The U.S. president gives some details about his upcoming budget proposal. An international mystery deepens concerning a murdered relative of North Korea's leader. A debate takes place regarding H-1B visas. And a crowdfunding site helps Americans cover the cost of adoption. It's all featured this Tuesday on CNN 10.
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Checking information - 09 - English at Work checks that things are correct


source: BBC Learning English    2016年8月30日
Anna's checking up on some orders today. As a result some of embarrassing mistakes in deliveries, Tip Top Trading's big boss in America has ordered a re-check of every order this month. Let's hear how she checks on things in the warehouse.
For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/...

TRANSCRIPT
Narrator: Welcome back! This is what's happening today: as a result some of embarrassing mistakes in deliveries, Tip Top Trading's big boss in America has ordered a re-check of every order this month. So, Paul is talking to key customers to see if they've got what they needed:
Paul: I just want to check you're happy with the grapes?
Narrator: Tom, whom we all know was responsible for the disaster, is phoning his clients to make sure he has the correct information about what they want:
Tom: Ya, yah, I just want to make absolutely sure we get the order right for you and have the correct number of fruit...
Narrator: Denise is, well, talking on the phone to a friend.
Denise: Brown shoes don't look right on him! He's not a brown shoe sort of person...
Narrator: Anna has to go down to the warehouse, where the products are prepared for delivery.
Anna: I have to speak to Mr Ingle. Apparently he's not very friendly! He might not like me asking lots of questions!
Narrator: Well, be polite, and start your sentences with things like:
I just want to make sure that...
Could you possibly clarify...
I just want to check...
Just to be absolutely clear...
One thing I wasn't sure of was...
Narrator: Good luck!
Anna: Mr Ingle, I don't think we've met yet, I'm Anna.
Ingle: Hello. Oi! What are you doing with those boxes? I told you to put them in storage. Anna, is it?
Anna: Yes, sorry to bother you, I just want to check something. We've had a few problems with orders….
Ingle: Well, that's not my fault. I do exactly what I'm asked to do. (To workers)
No, not there, in storage!
Anna: Oh, well, I just want to make sure that….
Ingle: Thirty years I've been doing this job, and I've never made a mistake.
Anna: Of course, but because we've had problems, we need to make absolutely sure that all deliveries are correct.
Ingle: Humph.
Anna: Could you possibly clarify what went out in today's delivery to Mr Berry of, er, Bluetree Enterprises?
Ingle: 500 redcurrants.
Anna: Right. That's fine.
Narrator: Well done Anna, this is going very well. Remember that other phrase – "I just want to check…"
Anna: OK. Now, I just want to check what was sent to Cocoline Limited – it should have been fifteen mangos –
Ingle: That's right.
Anna: Great, and just to be absolutely clear, you sent the soft mangos, not the plastic ones?
Ingle: Yes, just like I was told to.
Anna: Good. One thing I wasn't sure of was whether we had enough yellow bananas in stock – I know there are some purple ones, but...
Ingle: We do need more yellow bananas.
Anna: Okay, I'll just write that down. Thank you Mr Ingle. By the way, I like your overalls!
Ingle: Oh thanks.
Narrator: Well he was a bit unfriendly, but Anna got what she needed. Here are the phrases she used:
I just want to make sure that...
Could you possibly clarify...
I just want to check...
Just to be absolutely clear...
One thing I wasn't sure of was...
Well, everything in the warehouse seems to be okay. Back in the office, Tom is having less luck.
Tom: (on the phone) Really? Here it says 5,000 not five... oh...
Narrator: It's going to be a long day for him! Until next time. Bye!

The Past Tense of HAVE (with Rebecca)


source: Learn English with Rebecca     2017年1月31日
A basic, important grammar lesson for anyone learning English! Do we say “he didn’t have” or “he didn’t has”? If you are not sure of the correct form of the verb, this lesson is for you. It's a good idea to solidify basic, essential grammar concepts. In this lesson, I will teach you how to use the past tense of the commonly confused verb “to have” in affirmative, negative, and question forms. Practice with me and master this important verb! After watching, take the opportunity to practice what you've learned by doing the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar... . No more embarrassing mistakes for you!

Phrasal Verbs: BUMP INTO


source: Espresso English    2017年2月2日
http://bit.ly/2khiNa1 - Phrasal Verbs in Conversation Course

Spelling & Pronunciation Rules - with Michelle


source: Learn English with Let's Talk    2016年12月26日
Spelling & Pronunciation Rules you probably missed out in school - English pronunciation lesson for beginners.
http://www.learnex.in/english-spellin...
FAcebook - http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast
Website - http://www.letstalkpodcast.com

SPELLING RULES –
Rule #1
Whenever there is a 1 syllable word, ending in 1 vowel and 1 consonant, then the last consonant is doubled.
For example:
• Big- Biggest,
• Short- Shorter,
• Run- Running,
• Stop-Stopped
Exceptions: We don't double up the final consonant when it's w, x or y
For example: Wowed, Xeroxing, Praying

Rule #2
When 1st syllable is stressed, ends with 1 vowel and followed by 1 consonant then the last consonant is not doubled.
For Example:
• ENTer- Entered
• LISten – Listening
• SIMple- Simpler
• QUIet – Quietest

Rule #3
When 2nd syllable is stressed, ends with 1 vowel, and followed by 1 consonant then the last consonant is stressed:
For example:
• prefer (preFER) - preferring/preferred
• begin (beGIN) - beginning, beginner
• regret (reGRET) - regretting
• occur (oCUR) - occurred, occurring

Forever and a day - Shakespeare Speaks


source: BBC Learning English     2016年4月15日
The phrase forever and a day means the same as it did in Shakespeare's day: something – either good or bad – will last indefinitely, or for a very, very long time.

Narrator: It was a rainy day in July. William Shakespeare and his actor friend Robert Harley are rehearsing his comedy The Taming of the Shrew. Will's daughter is watching the rehearsal.

Robert Harley: Will, I do like your plays when everybody pretends to be somebody else!

Will: Thank you, Robert. The audience likes it too – that's why it's in the play.

Daughter: Father, I'm confused… Who is the young man in the teacher's costume?

Will: That is Lucentio, daughter. He is pretending to be a tutor so that he can be near to Bianca, whom he wants to marry.

Daughter: So the man wearing Lucentio's clothes isn't the real Lucentio?

Will: No, he's Lucentio’s servant. He's pretending to be Lucentio so that the real Lucentio can pretend to be a tutor.

Daughter: Ohhh! That's so romantic, isn't it, Robert?!

Robert Harley:Well it's very clever Will, but… I can't help thinking that Lucentio should just be a man about it: take the woman to the church and marry her.

Daughter: Ohhhhh…

Will: Well, Robert, that is exactly what happens. Lucentio's other servant, Biondello, tells him to stop playing games and to just marry Bianca, because otherwise he risks losing her – not just forever, but forever and a day. Let us rehearse.

Robert Harley as Biondello: To th' church take the priest, clerk, and some sufficient honest witnesses. If this be not that you look for, I have no more to say, But bid Bianca farewell forever and a day.

Daughter: Forever and a day – that's a long time to live without your true love…

Narrator: We'll leave them there for now. Putting characters in disguise was one of Shakespeare's favourite devices: not only because his audiences loved it, but also because it gave him opportunities to explore themes of class, status and love as he swapped the roles of rich and poor, old and young, and male and female characters. The phrase forever and a day means the same as it did in Shakespeare's day: something – either good or bad – will last indefinitely, or for a very, very long time. In his love song Forever and a Day, Lionel Richie sings…

Clip 1: And I'll love you for forever and a day day day day day day day day day day day day,
Forever and a day day day day day day day day…

Clip 2: Oh, look at that queue! We'll be waiting forever and a day. Let's come back tomorrow.

Will: Now, on with the rehearsal everybody…

Robert Harley: Speaking of husbands and wives – when are you bringing Mrs Shakespeare to London, Mr Shakespeare?

Will: Mrs Shakespeare prefers to remain at home in Stratford… and I prefer that too. To bring, or not to bring: that is the question…

BBC News Review: World's longest hunger strike ends


source: BBC Learning English    2016年8月9日
Irom Sharmila hasn't eaten anything for 16 years as a protest against army powers in India. Join Neil and Catherine in News Review as they bring you this story and the language you need to understand it.
For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/...
The story

One of India's best known political activists, Irom Sharmila, has told a court that she's ending a 16-year hunger strike, during much of which she's been force-fed in hospital.

She was protesting against a law that gives the Indian army sweeping powers.

Sanjoy Majunder - BBC news

She was able to leave the ambulance – she was supported by two policewomen, but was able to walk up the steps.

We understand she's told the judge that she stands by the decision she announced a few weeks ago – the decision to finally end her fast of 16 years.

Now remember it's a protest she began in the year 2000 against a law that grants the Indian security forces here in Manipur and other frontline states – sweeping powers to arrest suspects, even shoot to kill, and more importantly, immunity from prosecution.

That law still exists on the books. But she has decided to end her fast.
Key words and phrases

activist
person with a strong belief in a certain cause who takes action to achieve their aims

hunger strike
time during which someone refuses to eat as a protest

fast
period of time when a person chooses not to eat

'iron'
Here used as an adjective used to describe a person who is mentally and emotionally strong

Five Phrasal Verbs With 'Come'


source: Oxford Online English    2013年11月6日
A free English lesson from Oxford Online English. You can see the full lesson (with text) here: http://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/vi...
This class covers five common English phrasal verbs with the verb 'come.' You can learn about the verbs, how to use them, and how they are different from similar-looking phrasal verbs.

Pronunciation: Berry /b/ vs Very /v/


source: Shaw English Online     2014年1月27日
Follow Shaw English: http://bit.ly/1dTGEpiWatch
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Pronunciation: Bee /b/ vs Pee /p/


source: Shaw English Online   2014年1月27日
Follow Shaw English: http://bit.ly/1dTGEpiWatch
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TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ShawEnglish2014

The Imitation Technique (1)


source: mmmEnglish    2016年3月27日
Get Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE! https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SHp9
English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish
Read the full transcript: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2016/03/21...
mmmEnglish WEBSITE: https://goo.gl/W90K0V
FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB
Join my WOMEN ONLY Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish

Clothes (Learn English 27)


source: EF podEnglish    2007年11月28日
Learn how to talk about things you are not sure about in English using "may", "might" and "maybe. In this beginner English lesson you will see two friends trying to decide what to wear to a party. You will learn how to use "may" and "might" to express things that may happen but that are not certain.
http://www.englishtown.com/online/hom...
http://www.ef.com

Run Out - English Grammar Tutorial


source: Twominute English    2013年4月25日
Exercises for this lesson: http://twominenglish.com/video/156-Ru...
Facebook: http://facebook.com/twominenglish
App for your Android Device: https://play.google.com/store/apps/de...

0:06 In this lesson we will talk about the phrasal verb ‘run out’.
0:16 Hello. Today we’ll talk about the phrasal verb ‘run out’.
0:20 Americans use a lot of phrasal verbs, right?
0:24 Yes. To ‘run out’ means to use all of something so that there is none left.
0:29 It happens all the time with my money.
0:32 I always run out of money before the end of the month.
0:35 I know what you mean, man. By the way, can I borrow a few bucks?
0:40 Haha, very funny, Dean. When I run out of money, I visit my mom.
0:46 Yesterday, I ran out of gas on my way to my mom’s house, so I’m broke.
0:51 Well, we need to learn how to control our expenses
0:55 Can we use ‘run out’ for other things?
0:58 Sure. For example, I was taking a test last week and I ran out of time.
1:04 So, you didn’t finish it?
1:06 That’s right. I didn’t have time to answer all the questions.
1:10 I see. So, I can say that when I run out of eggs or milk, I make a list of these things so I’ll remember to buy more.
1:17 Good idea.
1:19 That’s a perfect example. And since I’ve run out of examples, let’s now listen to some conversations.
1:31 Good morning, dad. Where’s the orange juice?
1:35 We ran out last night and I haven’t had time to buy more.
1:39 Can I borrow your car and go buy some?
1:41 Sure. The keys are on the coffee table in the living room.
1:46 Do we need anything else?
1:49 Check the fridge and see if we’ve run out of butter, and check in the pantry if we’ve run out of cereal.
2:01 Dad. Can you believe the supermarket ran out of orange juice?
2:07 No way!!! What kind of store runs out of O.J.?
2:12 I know. But at least they hadn’t run out of cereal, so I got some
2:23 Clarice!! Why didn’t you tell me you ran out of medication?
2:28 I didn’t want to upset you…
2:32 Honey, I’ll worry more if you don’t tell me when you run out.
2:35 I know that sometimes I run out of patience with you, but this is very serious.
2:41 Always tell me when you run out, okay?
2:45 Ok, dad. I promise.
2:50 I always run out of money before the end of the month.
2:57 When I run out of money, I visit my mom
3:05 Yesterday, I ran out of gas on my way to my mom’s house, so I’m broke.
3:17 I was taking a test last week and I ran out of time.
3:25 Can you believe the supermarket ran out of orange juice?
3:35 What kind of store runs out of O.J.?
3:43 Why didn’t you tell me you ran out of medication?