CNN 10 with subtitles - March 2, 2017


source: English subtitle     2017年3月2日

Working long hours? – 11 – English at Work gives you the language


source: BBC Learning English     2016年9月13日
Someone's been working very long hours at Tip Top Trading. Anna is burning the candle at both ends – in other words she’s working from early until late preparing for the launch of their latest product – the Imperial Lemon. Denise is concerned about her working overtime, something she would never consider doing. But will Anna's extra efforts pay off or will she end up selling bananas instead of lemons?
For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/...

TRANSCRIPT
Narrator: It's late at the offices of Tip Top Trading. Anna is alone, working. Again. She's been doing this all week, she wants her presentation to Mr Lime to be perfect so she's been spending hours and hours on it. Anna?
Anna: Don't interrupt! I'm busy.
Narrator: Woah!
Anna: Sorry.
Narrator: Anna, you're really burning the candle at both ends.
Anna: What?
Narrator: Burning the candle at both ends – it means working very hard – working late and getting up early to work all the time.
Anna: Oh. I didn't know that expression.
Narrator: Well here are some more:
You're doing overtime; which means you're working longer than office hours.
You're putting in the hours; which means you are spending all the time needed to achieve something.
Anna: Yes, I'm putting in the hours to make sure my presentation is perfect.
Narrator: And if you don't mind me saying so, you might burn out; which means you are working so hard that you might get very tired and run out of energy.
Anna: I'm not burning out. I'm full of energy. I just need to finish this bit...
Denise: My goodness, nothing's locked. Do you think we've been burgled?
Tom: Oh no! I left my lap-book and my me-pad on the desk... and my i-top – they're worth thousands! They're all the latest versions!
Denise: I left out my elephant mug and my lady-curve nail file. They better not have stolen them!
Anna: (Talking in her sleep) but it's premium, premium, faux-orange premium!
Tom: Anna?
Denise: It's Anna, she's asleep. Anna!
Anna: (waking up with a jump) Oh! Lemons! Denise? Tom?
Tom: Have you spent the night asleep at your desk Anna?
Anna: Is it morning? Oh dear, yes I think so.
Denise: Well, at least we haven't been burgled then.
Tom: Anna, you've really been burning the candle at both ends lately.
Denise: Yes, you've been doing hours and hours of overtime. Most people get their work done within office hours and anyway, we don't pay overtime here. You’ll never find me working late!
Tom: Yes, I had noticed that Denise.
Anna: But this presentation must be perfect.
Denise: If you're not careful, you'll burn out! Then you'll really be of no use to anyone. You'll be as useful as a chocolate teapot.
Tom: It's good that you're putting in the hours Anna, but you should calm down. Look at me, I do very successful presentations without spending hours preparing.
Denise: Ha!
Tom: In my presentation to Every Apple I just swooshed in with no preparation after a night on the town. I charmed them. They loved me!
Narrator: Idiot. I bet he actually spent hours preparing he just can't admit it.
Anna: Well, maybe you're right. I can't think clearly anymore, I'm so tired. I need to sleep properly otherwise I'll end up trying to sell bananas instead of lemons.
Narrator: Anna has finally got the message: she's realised she's been working too much. She needs to be realistic. Here's a reminder of some of the phrases we heard to talk about how much Anna had been working:
Burning the candle at both ends.
Doing overtime.
Putting in the hours.
Burning out.
Let's hope she's thinking clearly by the time she has to do her presentation. Join us next time to find out! Bye.

Slang Words Starting With B


source: EnglishAnyone     2011年10月27日
http://www.englishanyone.com/power-le...
Just remember that slang is CASUAL English! Use slang with your friends and people you know well! Don't use slang with your boss, with the police if you get arrested or when meeting your girlfriend or boyfriend's parents for the first time!

Badass
A badass is someone who is ultra-cool. This term, usually used for strong, confident men, describes someone who does what he wants when he wants.
That guy is such a badass! He wrestles rhinos and drinks motor oil!

Bitch
Though bitch means female dog, the many slang meanings of this word can be applied to both men and woman. We'll look at a few of them in turn now.
When you call a woman a bitch, you're saying that she is being loud, rude, unreasonable and/or overly aggressive. Like "asshole," this is a very strong word, so don't use it on someone's grandmother.
I know you're upset, but you don't have to be such a bitch about it!
When a man is called a bitch, this usually means that he is being called weak or being made to feel bad because he is a subordinate, or a person of a lower rank. When a man is someone's bitch, this means that he is controlled by another person.
I'm hungry! Be my bitch and make me some breakfast!
As a verb, to bitch means to complain or whine too much about something you think is unfair.
Stop bitching about your situation and do something about it!

Ball (Bawl)
To ball means to cry a lot. We say that someone is balling their eyes out when they are sad and crying very loudly.
The little girl's dog ran away and she balled her eyes out for weeks.

Bombshell
We call a beautiful, sexy woman a bombshell to describe her as powerful and explosively hot.
I met this beautiful bombshell at a party and wanted to marry her instantly!

Beef
Beef refers to complaints or bad feelings. To have a problem with something is to have a beef with it.
I've had a beef with that guy ever since he tried to steal my girlfriend.

Beer Goggles
Goggles are the tight glasses you wear when swimming. Though they keep water out of your eyes, goggles usually get foggy and decrease your ability to see. Like goggles, alcohol also decreases your ability to think and see clearly. So, after someone has had a few drinks, can't see clearly and becomes more likely to want to sleep with, or have sex with, someone they wouldn't normally be attracted to, they're said to be wearing their beer goggles.

Someone may look ugly to you when you're sober, or not drinking, but they'll look fantastic with your beer goggles on!

Bollocks
Bollocks is British slang for testicles and is said when something is considered nonsense or an outright lie.
You're 25 years old? Bollocks! You look more like 60!

Bug Out
To bug out means to get away, or escape, very quickly. In an emergency, you bug out and get as far away as possible.
We had to bug out and run home when the lightning storm ruined our picnic.

Bite
Like taking a physical bite out of someone, to bite someone's words or style is to steal their idea or copy them. This slang is usually used by song writers and rappers when referring to someone using their lyrics. Someone who bites is a biter.
Don't bite my lyrics! Write your own!

12 Useful Expressions | Set 3


source: Mark Kulek     2017年1月25日

News Review: Elephants killed in Gabon


source: BBC Learning English    2017年2月22日
Elephants are dying in massive numbers in Gabon. Neil and Catherine look at the language the world's media is using to discuss this story - and show you how you can use it in your everyday English.
Watch the video and then test your understanding here
http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/...

Phrasal Verbs: PAY OFF


source: Espresso English    2017年2月4日
Phrasal Verbs in Conversation Course: http://bit.ly/2khiNa1
Lesson 1: Phrasal Verbs for Romantic Relationships: https://www.espressoenglish.net/phras...

Spotless reputation - Shakespeare Speaks


source: BBC Learning English    2016年3月31日
Why is William Shakespeare in trouble? Learn a phrase from Shakespeare that is still in use today.
For activities and extra materials connected to this episode: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/...
Shakespeare Speaks is a co-production by BBC Learning English and The Open University.

Narrator: It was a spring morning in 1601. William Shakespeare is visiting Queen Elizabeth I of England. She's not very happy today...

Queen Elizabeth I: I will not allow my enemies to live. Tomorrow that ill-faced, murderous coward the Earl of Essex will die, and the people will know that I commanded it.

Will: Very good, your Majesty.

Queen Elizabeth I: Your players will perform Richard II for me tomorrow.

Will: A great honour, your Majesty.

Queen Elizabeth I: Even though they performed that same play for the filthy, crooked Earl of Essex while he was planning to kill me…

Will: Your Majesty…

Queen Elizabeth I: I really ought to punish you and your players for that, Shakespeare – I should cut off all your heads, or at least imprison you in the Tower…

Will: Your Majesty…

Queen Elizabeth I: Lucky for you that I am a merciful Queen – but I am not weak. I will not allow anyone to speak badly of my character or my actions. I am Queen of England and my reputation is everything. My enemies must fear me and respect me and the people must love me. Gossips must be silenced and traitors must be punished. Do you not agree?

Will:Your Majesty is the wisest of queens. A good reputation is everything. Indeed, in my play, Richard II, Thomas Mowbray says: "My dear dear lord, The purest treasure…

Thomas Mowbray
My dear dear lord,
The purest treasure mortal times afford
Is spotless reputation:

Queen Elizabeth I: Well said, Shakespeare – a spotless reputation is truly the most important and precious thing in any life. You may go.

Will: Your Majesty…

Narrator: We'll leave them there for now. In Shakespeare's day, your reputation – the things other people believed and said about your character and actions – was very important. In fact, William Shakespeare's own reputation as a writer was so good that during his lifetime, several dishonest publishers published other, lesser writers' work, pretending that it was Shakespeare's. These days, the phrase spotless reputation describes a person or organisation that has a good, clean character and behaves decently and honestly. Take news website Scottish Herald, discussing the 2015 Volkswagen emissions data falsification scandal. It said:

Clip 1: Analysts have also asked whether the revelations will cause irreversible damage to Volkswagen's previously spotless reputation.

Clip 2: Another athlete caught taking drugs? I'm surprised at this one though – she always had a spotless reputation.

Will: Robert, Thomas, give me some ale… we're doing Richard II, tomorrow. And it'd better be good, or it could be the Tower.

Robert Harley & Thomas Swann:Oh dear. Oh no. To the tower, or not to the tower: that is the question.

A royal reputation: Shakespeare Speaks Extras

source: BBC Learning English   2016年3月21日
The phrase 'spotless reputation' describes a person or organisation that has a good, clean character and behaves decently and honestly. There's more great Shakespeare content at our partner - The Open University’s - website, here: http://www.open.edu/openlearn/languag...

English Vocabulary - Phrasal Verbs


source: Oxford Online English    2013年9月11日
A lesson from Oxford Online English. You can see the full lesson (with text and exercises) here: http://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/vi....
Phrasal verbs are verbs with two parts which combine to make one meaning, for example 'get up,' 'look through' and 'throw away' are all phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs are very common in spoken English, but they are also confusing for many English learners! In this lesson I'll give you an introduction to the topic of phrasal verbs, and give you some tips to help you learn phrasal verbs more easily and effectively.
Want to keep up to date with our free lessons? Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/oxfordonlinee...

Pronunciation: Bat /æ/ vs But /Ʌ/


source: Shaw English Online    2014年1月27日
Follow Shaw English: http://bit.ly/1dTGEpiWatch
Molly teaches the difference between the /æ/ and /Ʌ/ English sounds. This is the perfect video to practice and improve your English pronunciation.
For example, she will teach how to pronounce words like 'bat' and 'but'.
WEBSITE: http://www.shawenglish.com
FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1l3Hjsm
GOOGLE+: http://bit.ly/1l3HsMf
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ShawEnglish2014

Pronunciation: Poke /oʊ/ vs Pork /ɔːr/


source: Shaw English Online    2014年1月27日
Follow Shaw English: http://bit.ly/1dTGEpiWatch
Molly teaches the difference between the /oʊ/ and /ɔːr/ English sounds. This is the perfect video to practice and improve your English pronunciation.
For example, she will teach how to pronounce words like 'poke' and 'pork'.
WEBSITE: http://www.shawenglish.com
FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1l3Hjsm
GOOGLE+: http://bit.ly/1l3HsMf
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ShawEnglish2014

Improve your English Pronunciation!


source: mmmEnglish    2016年5月30日
*** DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PRONUNCIATION WORKSHEET *** http://bit.ly/mmmPron1
In this lesson, I'll show you how to use the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to practice English pronunciation. If you learn and practice with the IPA, you will be able to pronounce any English word in the dictionary - even if you have never heard it before!
Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2016/05/31...
Get Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE! https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SHp9
English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish
mmmEnglish WEBSITE: https://goo.gl/W90K0V
FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB
Join my WOMEN ONLY Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish

Planning a Trip (Learn English 32)


source: EF podEnglish    2007年2月7日
Learn how to construct superlatives in English like "the biggest" or "the best". In this beginner English lesson you will watch two friends talking about where to go on a beach vacation. They describe which types of beaches they like best. You will learn the English grammar to make superlatives using the "-est" ending on short adjectives and "the most" for longer adjectives.
http://bit.ly/98HmQM
http://www.ef.com

'Beside' vs 'Besides' - Learn Proper Usage In English


source: Twominute English    2013年4月26日
Exercises for this lesson: http://twominenglish.com/video/108--B...
Facebook: http://facebook.com/twominenglish
App for your Android Device: https://play.google.com/store/apps/de...

0:06 In this lesson we will learn how to use ‘beside’ and ‘besides’ in a conversation without getting confused.
0:18 The word ‘besides’ is used to add extra or additional information about the same topic.
0:22 ‘Beside’ refers to something which is close, or nearby.
0:26 Yes Mark, you are right. ‘Besides’ is used when we want to show that there is something more to say about something.
0:32 We use the word ‘beside’ to show that something or someone is next to something or someone else.
0:39 That is correct, June. Would you give me an example using ‘besides’?
0:44 Yes, sure, here is one:
0:47 Besides the pain, the boy also has high fever.
0:51 Thank you June. That is right. Here is one for ‘beside’: The child sat beside his mother as she told him a story.
0:59 That is good, Mark. Please give me the pen which is beside the book.
1:04 Let me write some other words besides what we have learned.
1:10 Great work June! You showed the proper use of beside and besides in one go.
1:14 So it’s clear that ‘beside’ describes something that’s next to you.
1:18 And you use ‘besides’ when you want to talk about something that’s in addition to what you are mentioning.
1:26 Now let’s see some sample conversations.
1:35 The driver said we have little fuel; besides, there’s no gas station nearby.
1:40 There’s a gas station there; don’t you see the sign beside that billboard?
1:44 Sorry, I forgot to bring my glasses, besides, it is raining.
1:49 I understand Sam. Besides, I am the one sitting by the window.
1:53 I think we should stop here for a while. Besides, we have traveled a long distance, so far.
1:59 That’s right. Let me talk to the driver.
2:07 Let’s go to the garden. It would be good to sit beside those flowers.
2:11 Yes, that would be great, besides, there is a fruit shop over there.
2:15 That’s right, but we don’t have much time.
2:18 Don’t worry Mike. I have told the driver to wait for a little while.
2:28 Hey Sam, look at that snake beside the rock!
2:31 Really? But how did it get there? Besides, there is no forest nearby.
2:36 That is right. It looks dangerous, besides there are children playing around.
2:41 Let me go and call the guard, I saw him sitting beside the water fountain.
2:45 Yes, do it quick!
2:47 Right Mike, just sit beside this log and watch it ‘till I return.
2:51 Ok, Sam, I’ll make sure the children don’t go near it.
2:58 There’s a gas station there; don’t you see the sign beside that billboard?
3:06 I forgot to bring my glasses, besides, it is raining.
3:16 The child sat beside his mother as she told him a story.
3:23 Let me write some other words besides what we have learned.
3:33 Let me go and call the guard, I saw him sitting beside the water fountain.
3:43 It would be good to sit beside those flowers.
3:50 Right Mike, just sit beside this log and watch it ‘till I return.
3:58 Yes, that would be great, besides, there is a fruit shop over there.