20180526: an important announcement from the editor

       Around mid-April, a very strange and unexpected situation occurred and has continued for more than a month now, propelling me to make the following decision about a week ago: I’m sorry but I’ve decided to stop all publishing activities on my education-related websites. (Click this line to read the full post.)

BBC News Review: Mr Markle may not attend royal wedding


source: BBC Learning English        2018年5月15日
Reports suggest that Meghan Markle's father may not attend her wedding to Prince Harry. It follows the appearance of photographs showing him being measured for a wedding suit and reading newspaper stories about his daughter. He is reported to have said that he did not want to cause his daughter embarrassment by attending the wedding. Dan and Catherine bring you the language you need to talk about this story.

Language challenge: 
Who takes photos of celebrities to sell to newspapers and magazines?
a) shutterbugs
b) photojournalists
c) paparazzi
Watch the video and complete the activity

The story
There is uncertainty whether Meghan Markle's father will attend Saturday's wedding between his daughter and Prince Harry, the sixth in line to the British throne.
It follows reports that Thomas Markle co-operated with a paparazzi photographer to pose for pictures. Mr. Markle had been expected to walk his daughter down the aisle, but he's now reported to have told journalists that he's decided not to go.

Vocabulary:
--fiasco: complete embarrassing failure
• Filming was a complete fiasco - the cameras didn't work and the sound was bad.
• There was a bit of a fisaco when the best man realised he'd lost his speech!
--bails: quits before the end
• Don't rely on John for anything. He always bails at the last minute.
• He bailed on the presentation to go to the beach?! Tell him he's fired immediately!
--frantic: out of control due to worry or urgency
• After the earthquake, their frantic rescue attempts saved many lives.
• Dan's mum was frantic with worry when she couldn't find him at the theme park.

# materials above: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english...

Why you should make mistakes, and how to learn from them


source: Learn English with Emma [engVid]        2018年4月6日
Are you embarrassed or frustrated when you make mistakes? You are not alone. Many learners feel bad when they make a mistake, but they don't realize that making mistakes can help them improve! In fact, making mistakes is one of the BEST WAYS TO LEARN, especially if you are trying to learn a language. In this video, I will teach you that making mistakes is a very important part of learning a language. I will then show you some ways you can use your mistakes to improve your English. We will go through some practical tips on what you should do to maximize your learning. Which mistakes should you focus on? How do you know what your mistakes are? How can you make sure that you are improving? For answers to these questions and more, watch the video.

English with TV Series: Joey's Perverted Tailor (Friends)


source: Learn English With TV Series        2016年11月8日

The smart way to improve your English | Learn Collocations


source: mmmEnglish        2018年4月13日
Have you heard of collocations? When two or more words go together naturally in English - words that often appear together in sentences.
Learning COLLOCATIONS (rather than individual words) helps you to sound more fluent and natural when you use English!
In this lesson, I'll go through 20 collocations with the verb MAKE (words that often appear in sentences with the verb make!)

Learn Scientific English Vocabulary used in daily English conversations ...


source: Learn English with Let's Talk          2018年4月20日
Learn Scientific English Vocabulary used in daily English conversations | Improve your English level When you think of scientific English words, I am sure it sends shivers down your spine. Don’t worry, in today’s English Vocabulary with your English teacher Michelle, you will learn some useful scientific English words used in daily English conversations. Practice these words as you learn them in your Everyday English speaking to advance your English level and speak fluent English confidently. At Let’s Talk we always strive to provide better English lessons related to Grammar, Pronunciation, Vocabulary, English conversation etc. So that you could improve your English and communicate more confidently in the English language.

If you watch only one Task 2 video this year, make it this one...


source: IELTS Ryan        2018年4月25日

Uncountable Nouns


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com      2018年4月24日
Do you know uncountable nouns and their quantifiers?

How to use real conditionals


source: BBC Learning English       2018年1月15日
🙋Talk about things that might happen in the future with real conditionals! 🙋
What will you do tomorrow if it’s raining? ☔ What will you do if it’s sunny?☀️

Let's Learn English Level 2 Lesson 19: Movie Night


source: VOA Learning English             2018年2月8日

English in a Minute: Spread Yourself Too Thin


source: VOA Learning English           2018年2月3日

Commonly Confused Words: SAY vs TELL


source: Interactive English          2017年8月1日
In this lesson, we'll explore the difference between SAY vs TELL and see how these words are used in a variety of contexts. We'll teach you some popular collocations (words frequently used together) and even do a fun practice at the end. So be prepared to test your knowledge of SAY and TELL.

What Should You Say? Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays?


source: Speak English with Christina        2015年12月18日

Phrasal Verbs related to the Emotion, Anger


source: Gerry English Expressions        2016年2月13日

CNN 10 - May 18, 2018


source: Karl be ba         2018年5月17日

Learn 5 English expressions with MAKE


source: Crown Academy of English        2018年4月3日
Here are the expressions and phrases that you will learn in this lesson:
make a fortune
make a scene
make one's mind up
make fun of someone
make something up

During the video, for each expression, I explain the definition and meaning, pronunciation and then give you some examples with photographs.
The accent is British English, spoken by a native speaker.

Learn English through Movies | Brad Pitt & Fight Club


source: Learn English With TV Series        2018年4月13日

How To Make Colors Foam Clay Bears Toy DIY


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com      2018年4月21日

Talking Culture: Why Brits Don't Tip Well!


source: Learn English with Papa Teach Me     2018年4月21日
How much should you tip a waiter in the US?
How much should you tip for a cocktail? How much for a fancy cocktail?
How much tip does a taxi driver get?
Today the amazing Dan Fox teaches me all about tipping in the US and how to be a good tipper!

This video improves your IELTS Speaking Part 2!


source: IELTS Ryan        2018年4月14日

Three Communication Codes in American Business


source: Speak English with Christina        2018年4月23日
WHAT YOU'LL LEARN:
1. The importance of small talk
2. How to situate yourself in the hierarchy, when everyone seems friendly and relaxed
3. How to interpret frequent interruptions
4. What to do if you hear "Get to the point" or "Cut to the chase"

Just the ticket: The English we Speak


source: BBC Learning English        2018年1月22日
Has Feifei taken Rob's birthday present too literally? He'd like something that he really wants or needs but as he discovers, his gift is right under his nose! Find out what it is and learn an authentic English phrase that might be 'just the ticket' for something you want to say!


# Transcript: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/featur...
Feifei
Hello, I'm Feifei, and this is The English We Speak and today I'm with Rob. Hi Rob, how are you?

Rob
Hi Feifei… I'm fine but I can't quite understand why you've brought me to a railway station.

Feifei
Isn't that obvious?

Rob
No. And what's that piece of paper you're waving in your hand?

Feifei
Oh this? This is a ticket.

Rob
A ticket. Why would you bring me to a railway station and show me a ticket? It's cold and we could be in a warm studio presenting this programme. And anyway, don't you know it's my birthday and we're supposed to be going out to celebrate later?

Feifei
I know it's your birthday, you told me last week and you said something about wanting a present that was 'just the ticket'. So here it is.

Rob
Oh Feifei – I didn't want a ticket – when I said 'just the ticket' I meant I wanted something that was exactly what I wanted or needed: A camera, a computer game or maybe a nice bottle of whisky.

Feifei
Oh right, I see.

Rob
Oh dear, what a wasted trip Feifei. Now we're here, let's hear some more examples of the phrase 'just the ticket'…

Examples
Oh I feel terrible: I've got a cold and my nose it blocked but a drink of hot honey and lemon would be just the ticket to make me feel better.

I think a new art gallery will be just the ticket for improving the image of the town and encouraging more people to visit.

Our car has got seven seats, so it's just the ticket for taking all the kids to football practice every week.

Feifei
So that's 'just the ticket' – which describes something that exactly what is wanted or needed. OK Rob, so you wanted something for your birthday that was 'just the ticket' – well you're looking at it.

Rob
You Feifei?

Feifei
No Rob. This ticket in my hand. Have you actually looked at it?

Rob
OK let me see… Wow! A train ticket to Paris, for me? That's really generous of you. Thanks Feifei! When do we go?

Feifei
We? No, it's just one ticket – I couldn't afford two. Now look, the train's about to leave so you had better go. Have a good trip!

Rob
Oh right. Well I had better go. See ya.

Feifei
Bye Rob. Phew, two days in the office without Rob – that is 'just the ticket' for me!

So and Such: The Grammar Gameshow Episode 14


source: BBC Learning English         2018年1月10日
Welcome to the Grammar Gameshow! Test your knowledge in this crazy quiz! The presenter is a bit strange, the points don't make sense and the prizes could use some improvement, but at least the grammar is correct!
Well done, Mark! He has survived through to another round. But don’t relax just yet, here comes Selene, our newest contestant. Together, they will have to face the awesome might of 'so' and 'such'. Those two little intensifiers that allow us to modify adjectives and nouns! Will Mark or Selene win? Can you answer their questions? What’s that weird energy between them? Find out in this episode of the Grammar Gameshow!

English @ the Movies: 'Leaving To Chance'


source: VOA Learning English         2018年4月27日

News Words: Ominous


source: VOA Learning English        2018年4月26日

How to Use the Definite Article (THE) & Zero Article (X)


source: Interactive English      2017年7月29日
Articles are those tricky little words we often find before nouns. Sometimes we use them and sometimes we don't. In this lesson, we'll look at the difference between the Definite Article (THE) and the Zero Article (X). We'll talk about how to use these articles (or how NOT to use them), and some of the rules we should follow to help us become better speakers and writers.

Talking About Your Flight - Learn English Vocabulary


source: Speak English with Christina      2015年12月13日

Three-Word Phrasal Verbs #2


source: Gerry English Expressions       2016年2月11日

Learn 35 English phrases for making friends & asking someone out on a date


source: English Jade - Learn English (engVid)       2018年4月4日
Learn 35 useful conversational phrases for making friends or asking someone out on a date. Meeting new people can be awkward, especially if you don’t know the language perfectly. In this lesson, I will teach you what to say when you first meet someone new at a class or activity, what to say when you meet someone by chance, and what to say when you want to get to know someone better and to deepen your relationship. Learn these phrases and you will improve your conversational ability in friendship and dating situations.

CNN 10 - May 17, 2018


source: Karl be ba               2018年5月16日

Learn English with TV Series: The Big Bang Theory


source: Learn English With TV Series          2016年11月4日

Pronunciation Lesson: Speak Fluent English


source: Speak English With Vanessa              2018年4月13日

How to Use ACTUALLY, KiND OF, AT ALL?


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com        2018年4月21日
In this video, Alisha answers 7 questions.
- Could you explain, please, how to use the expressions: ""at all, kind of, actually and big picture""?
- Hey Alisha, what does ""you just made my day"" mean? I still don't fully understand it.
- Hi Alisha. I love your lessons. What's the difference between words: intelligent, smart and clever? Thank you so much.
- ""Back to back"", what does this mean? Sometimes I hear this in baseball games
- I'm reading Harry Potter and I've just seen the sentence: ""G'night, Harry"". How do you pronounce it?
- Wich is the diference of pronuciation about life and live?
- What is the correct use, is it ""I have breakfast... I have lunch... I have dinner"" or ""I breakfast... I lunch... I dine""?

10 Useful Tips to Help You Become an Excellent Writer ✍️


source: Interactive English       2018年4月28日
We use our writing skills all the time. So here are some useful & practical suggestions on how to become a better writer. Watch & learn.

How to Improve Your Pronunciation | Expert Tips


source: ETJ English          2018年4月26日

Talk about food expertise in 6 minutes


source: BBC Learning English        2018年4月12日
More and more people in the UK are describing themselves as 'foodies', but do they really know that much about the things they eat? In this 6 Minute English, we hear from one of Britain's top chefs and learn some related vocabulary.

Vocabulary
foodie: someone who is very interested in all aspects of food
a little bit: a small amount
romantic: describes an imagined ideal situation
affordable: something we have enough money to buy
in danger of: the possibility of something bad happening

Seal pup accommodation crisis: Learn today's words and phrases: sanctuary, rescue centre, rehab, recuperation


source: BBC Learning English       2018年1月17日
# materials below: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/fea...
The story…
Seal pup accommodation crisis
Learn language related to…
recovery:
Need-to-know language
sanctuary – a place of safety
rescue centre – a place injured or ill animals or people are taken to be cared for
rehab – short for rehabilitation; the process of returning to good health
recuperate – to become well again after an illness or injury
Answer this
Why is the situation so bad for the seal pups this winter?

Transcript
On a suburban estate… a pop-up seal sanctuary.

With the local rescue centres full, these orphaned pups are having to be housed in a garage near St Ives (UK). Father and son, David and Dan, are fully trained and caring for the seals 24-7.

Dan Jarvis, British Divers Marine Life Rescue
“We are at the point where we really are (struggling). I mean, this sort of speaks for itself really, having all of these guys here. The rehab centres just don't have the space to handle this many pups in such a short amount of time.”

Every day, volunteers from the group are racing to the Cornish coast to rescue unprecedented numbers of sick and starving pups, orphaned and injured in the winter storms.

Providing emergency food is the easy bit. Finding them somewhere to recuperate is much more difficult. They've had nearly 300 call-outs already this winter.

So why are things so bad this winter?

Sue Sayer, Researcher, Cornwall Seal Group
“Because we've had a succession of storms over really high tides; (it’s) flooded all the beaches, washed all those seal pups out without enough food inside them to survive.”

Rescue teams all around the UK are reporting record numbers of seals needing help. 

Once these pups have recovered, they'll be sent back into the sea.

Conservationists say if we're going to avoid an accommodation crisis next winter, we need to start planning now.

Did you get it?
Why is the situation so bad for the seal pups this winter?

A succession of storms over really high tides has flooded all the beaches and washed out all the seal pups without enough food inside them to survive.

Did you know?
Like humans, seals take approximately nine months to gestate inside the womb. Once born, pups take up to six years to reach sexual maturity. Seals have an average lifespan of 25-30 years.

English @ the Movies: 'Hold Them Accountable'


source: VOA Learning English           2018年4月20日

News Words: Sophisticated


source: VOA Learning English                      2018年4月19日

How to Pronounce 25 Brands


source: Interactive English       2017年7月27日

Welcoming A Visitor In English - Business English lessons


source: Speak English with Christina      2015年12月6日

Phrasal Verbs related to Crime & Punishment


source: Gerry English Expressions          2016年2月10日

CNN 10 May 16, 2018


source: Chau Pham         2018年5月15日

Learn English with How I Met Your Mother (Barney's Look-Alike)


source: Learn English With TV Series       2016年9月13日

SMART Goals to Improve Your English Learning


source: Oxford Online English           2018年4月12日
To make progress in English, you need to think about your goals. In this lesson, you'll learn how to set SMART goals and how this can help you learn English more effectively.
This lesson will help you learn:
- About SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, time-bound)
- What SMART goals are and why it's important to set them.
- How to add effective time limits to your goals.
- Ways to make sure your goals are achievable.
- How to make goals like 'Improving English Pronunciation', and set them up so you can achieve them using SMART goals.
- Ways to set minor goals so you can better achieve your bigger goals.

You Are FIRED! – Business English Vocabulary


source: Learn English with Let's Talk        2018年4月9日
You are learning English so that you could speak English in Real life. English in textbooks is so different from spoken English in the real world. You need a lot of English conversation practice to be a fluent English speaker. This Business English lesson brings you a conversation between an employee and a boss who is annoyed, learn some English phrases from the conversation and focus on the English pronunciation. You would also learn some great idioms used in the conversation. We hope this English conversation lesson helps you gather some great vocabulary that you could use in your daily English conversations. Practice English phrases from this lesson and implement them as you get a chance.

Business English Expressions Quiz


source: Espresso English       2018年4月15日

for Advanced Reading Comprehension: Train Station


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com     2018年4月20日
In this video, you’ll challenge your English reading comprehension skills.

How to Pronounce the Most Common English Words


source: ETJ English         2018年4月19日

Who needs a manbag? Learn to talk about men's fashion in 6 minutes!


source: BBC Learning English       2018年3月29日
6 Minute English discusses the trend for manbags. These designer accessories are being carried on the arms and shoulders of many modern men but they're not just for looking good, they're practical too. Find out who really is carrying one and learn some new vocabulary along the way.

# materials below: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/feat...
This week's question:
According to market research company Mintel, do you know how many men bought a manbag in the UK last year? Was it…
a) 5%
b) 15%
c) 25%
Listen to the programme to find out the answer.

Vocabulary:
accessory: an additional item added to something to make it more useful or attractive
laughing stock: someone who people think of as silly
sturdy: strong and not easily damaged
masculinity: characteristics that are traditionally thought to be typical of men
hefty price tag: high price
inhibitions: a feeling of embarrassment that stops you from doing something

Transcript 
(Note: This is not a word for word transcript)
Rob
Welcome to 6 Minute English, the programme where we explore an interesting topic and bring you some useful items of vocabulary. I'm Rob.

Neil
And I'm Neil. And today we are discussing manbags.

Rob
Yes, manbags - they are the height of fashion at the moment – a stylish accessory that modern men are carrying. An accessory is an additional item added to something to make it more useful or attractive.

Neil
I'm not so sure Rob. I mean, I wouldn't be seen dead carrying a manbag!

Rob
Really! So what do you carry your lose change, your credit cards, tickets and mobile phone in?

Neil
I just stuff everything in my pockets Rob – it's better than being a laughing stock, carrying a handbag around!

Rob
By laughing stock you mean everyone thinking of you as silly – but you wouldn't be because it's a manbag Neil – not a woman's handbag. Maybe I can convince you to change your mind by the end of the programme. But now let's not forget to ask you today's question…

Neil
Is it about manbags by any chance?

Rob
It is so it might be tricky for you to answer! According to market research company Mintel, how many men bought a manbag in the UK last year? Was it…
a) 5%
b) 15%
c) 25%

Neil
Well obviously not many, so I'm going to say 5%. And I'm not one of them!

Rob
OK, you've made that very clear! We'll find out the answer at the end of the programme anyway. Now let's talk more about manbags. For hundreds of years women have carried their possessions around in handbags, so why can't a man do the same with a manbag?

Neil
Maybe it's the name. Why can't it just be a bag? Why does a bag have to have a gender?

Rob
It's a trend Neil – a stylish fashion item designed to look good on men. Many big names have flocked to adopt the trend. Pharrell Williams, David Beckham and Kanye West, are just some of those who've been spotted rocking a manbag. Rocking is an informal way of saying 'wearing'.

Neil
But what's wrong with a sturdy briefcase – sturdy means strong and not easily damaged. Are you saying manbags are just fashionable?

Rob
No, they're practical too. We've always needed bags to carry stuff around but what we carry these days has changed – you know laptops, mobiles, even our lunch – so why not have a trendy looking bag to carry these things around in?

Neil
I think part of the problem is carrying one is not seem as very a British by some people. We're not always as stylish as our some of our European neighbours, are we?

Rob
Well, speak for yourself! But Nick Carvell, GQ Contributing Fashion Editor has a reason for this. Here he is speaking on BBC Radio 4's You and Yours programme…

Nick Carvell, GQ Contributing Fashion Editor
In Britain we are still very tied up with that idea of masculinity that is almost so fragile that it can be dented by carrying a bag. We think a lot about that in this country in a way that I don't think a lot of European men do.

Rob
So Nick feels some British men are still tied up with the idea of masculinity – these are the characteristics traditionally thought to be typical of men. And for us British men, these characteristics are fragile – they can be easily broken.

Neil
Yes, we can also call it manliness – things like not crying during a sad film. It's a slightly old-fashion idea but it could still be dented – or affected – if a man was caught carrying a manbag.

Rob
Whereas some European men don't give it a lot of thought, according to Nick Carvell.

Neil
But with people like Louis Vuitton, Fendi, Gucci and Dolce and Gabbana designing these bags, they're bound to have a hefty price tag – that's an informal way of saying a high price.

Rob
Well fashion comes at a price Neil – you need to shake off your inhibitions – that's a feeling of embarrassment that stops you from doing something. And if you really want to be on trend you could also splash out on a 'murse' that's a man's purse, or a 'mote' – a man's tote bag? Have I convinced you?

Neil
No, not really Rob. I have a feeling that a manbag by any other name is, well, a bag – and I have one - my trusty backpack.

Rob
Well for some people, manbags are the thing – but, as I asked earlier, according to market research company Mintel, how many men actually bought a manbag in the UK last year? Was it…
a) 5%
b) 15%
c) 25%

Neil
And I said a) 5%. Come on, I must have been right!

Rob
You were wrong Neil. The answer was actually 15%. And nearly a quarter of 16-34 year olds have bought one.

Neil
Well as I say Rob, a good practical backpack is for me. But now shall we unpack some of the vocabulary we've discussed today. Starting with 'accessory' which is an additional item added to something to make it more useful or attractive. "A tie is a smart accessory to wear with a suit."

Rob
Maybe, but you wouldn't catch me wearing a suit in my media job – it's all t-shirts and jeans for us! If I came to work in a suit I would be a 'laughing stock' – I mean, I would be seen as someone who people think of as silly.

Neil
Our next word was 'sturdy' – something that is sturdy is strong and not easily damaged. "If you're walking up a mountain you need to wear some sturdy walking boots."

Rob
Good advice – if I was going up a mountain, which I'm not. Next we mentioned 'masculinity'. These are the characteristics that are traditionally thought to be typical of men. So we sometimes refer to it as being macho! Like: "Neil went swimming in ice cold water to prove his masculinity." 

Neil
That I would never do – I'd rather carry a manbag – despite their hefty price tag – that means 'high price'.

Rob
Finally, we also mentioned the word 'inhibitions' – that's feelings of embarrassment that stop you from doing something. "Neil's inhibitions are stopping him from carrying a manbag."

Neil
It's a bag Rob – just a bag! But we've talked enough about this so that's it for this edition of 6 Minute English. But before you rush off to purchase a designer manbag, don't forget to visit our Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube pages. Bye for now.

Rob
Bye.

FOMO: fear of missing out (The English We Speak)


source: BBC Learning English        2018年1月15日
Rob's off to a rock concert and Feifei's not been invited. She's not happy, especially because she thinks she's got 'FOMO'. Find out what this means and if FOMO is an illness of the body or the mind. But don't worry, Feifei's FOMO won't last long!

Transcript: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/...
Rob
Hello and welcome to The English We Speak from BBC Learning English. I'm Rob...

Feifei
And hello, I'm Feifei. We're here to teach you a real English phrase… Rob, what's that you're holding there?

Rob
Oh this… just a ticket to see one of my favourite rock bands in concert – The Rolling Thrones.

Feifei
Oh great – and I see you've got more than one ticket.

Rob
Yes, that's right, a few of us from the office are going – it's tonight! I'm very excited.

Feifei
[SOUNDING JEALOUS] Oh right – Rob, it sounds fun - maybe I could get a ticket and join you?

Rob
Why? You don't like rock music and you always stay in and wash your hair on a Thursday – or so you tell me anyway. Oh Feifei, you've got FOMO.

Feifei
I've got 'FOMO'? Is that bad? Is that why you didn't invite me? Oh dear, should I go and see a doctor?

Rob
No, don't see a doctor. FOMO is an acronym for 'fear of missing out'. It's a worried feeling you have that other people are doing fun things when you are not – you're missing out!

Feifei
Oh, we'd better hear some examples of other people with FOMO…

Examples
I know Martha's got FOMO, she's been moaning about not being invited to Wang's karaoke party – but she doesn't even like karaoke!

All my friends are going on holiday together but I can't afford it so I've got FOMO.

There's a message on Facebook that all the tickets to that gig are sold out – now I have a feeling of FOMO!

Feifei
So that's FOMO – fear of missing out – which describes a feeling you might have when you feel other people are doing something fun, when you are not.  Well Rob, now I know what it means, I know I haven't got it. I just wanted to be sociable, and have some fun with you all.

Rob
Sorry Feifei, even if you could get a ticket, it's boys only I'm afraid.

Feifei
Oh look, I've got a message on my social media feed… is the lead singer of your band called Mick Dagger?

Rob
That's him – the finest rock singer around – why?

Feifei
It says here, he's fallen down the stairs and broken his leg. The rock concert is cancelled!

Rob
Cancelled? Oh no. Err, what did you say you were doing tonight?

Feifei
Washing my hair.

Rob
Any chance I could come round… watch a movie, get a takeaway?

Feifei
Oh dear Rob. Have you got FOMO now? Bye.

Rob
Bye.

English @ the Movies: 'Get Me'


source: VOA Learning English      2018年4月13日

News Words: Collusion


source: VOA Learning English        2018年4月12日

15 HAPPY WORDS | English Vocabulary Lesson


source: Interactive English       2017年7月25日
Get happy with us and learn 15 happy words! These synonyms for "happy" will make you a better speaker as well as help you better express yourself when you are feeling happy.

Being French In The USA, With Mathilde Piton


source: Speak English with Christina       2015年11月29日
Contents:
0:00 - introduction
3:40 — Culture shock, living abroad and going back to your own country
4:40 — Things Mathilde found different when she first arrived in USA
7:00 — Differences in mentality, attitude towards French people, American stereotypes of French people
10:45 — Speaking English with Americans, understanding the American accent, and speaking so Americans you can understand you
13:00 —Working on your pronunciation
18:15—Lack of confidence when speaking English and what to do about it
16:50 —Work culture in the US vs France; advice for working with Americans
21:00 —One piece of advice for French people coming to the US, either to live, work, or just to visit

Phrasal Verbs - Topic: Relationships


source: Gerry English Expressions         2016年2月4日

Wish vs. Hope: How to Wish Someone Something Nice in English


source: Simple English Videos        2018年4月13日
Learn how to use the verbs 'wish' and 'hope' to give someone good wishes.
We use the verbs 'wish' and 'hope' differently. 'Wish' is more formal so when someone is wishing someone something, it's more likely to be written English. When we're talking about future possibilities we generally use 'hope'. In this video you'll see lots of examples and learn some other common phrases for wishing people nice things like 'Have a nice day' and 'Have a great weekend'.

CNN 10 May 15, 2018


source: Chau Pham         2018年5月14日

CNN 10 -- May 14 2018


source: Milad M         2018年5月13日

How to use Reflexive Pronouns


source: Maple Leaf ESL      2018年4月3日
In this lesson, we look at how to use reflexive pronouns, as in 'I cut myself while shaving'.

How to Talk About Music in English? - Basic English Phrases


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com      2018年4月17日

Learn English with TV Series: Friends


source: Learn English With TV Series        2016年6月10日

British Weather | Vocabulary & Pronunciation Lesson


source: ETJ English         2018年4月12日

Laundry Vocabulary! | Speaking and Pronunciation


source: Rachel's English        2018年4月17日
How to Use this Video:
The vocabulary words in this video are all about the laundry. But the best way for you to use this video is to think of it as a vocabulary builder exercise. I recommend that you go over the entire vocabulary list multiple times, repeating along with me as I teach you the proper pronunciation. I want you to use the video as a vocabulary workshop, putting in as many repetitions as necessary for you to understand each of the vocabulary words with meaning. What do I mean by that? I’m getting at the idea that vocabulary meaning is more than simple repetition. By learning these vocabulary words in the context of an everyday situation, you have the opportunity to learn English in-context. That’s crucial. Whenever you can learn vocabulary words with meaning—within the actual real-life context—you’re going to automatically increase the power of the vocabulary builder that you’re using, no matter what type it is or who the teacher is. The vocabulary list in this video is confined to a specific daily situation—doing the laundry—and that’s done with purpose on my part. My belief is that if you watch this video multiple times, repeat along with me and truly push yourself to use it as a vocabulary workshop you will easily and permanently incorporate this vocabulary list into your permanent memory and daily lexicon. That’s the power of learning English in a real-life context. It’s much more successful than trying to memorize a long list of vocabulary words. I’m really proud of my vocabulary builder videos—I hope you check them all out and that you commit 100% to my vocabulary workshop model of learning!—and I would love to hear from you in the comments about what you think  Good luck to you and I hope you enjoy learning these vocabulary words with meaning.

Do a runner: The English We Speak


source: BBC Learning English      2018年1月8日
Rob's running away from something – but what is it and why? This seems like a perfect example of 'doing a runner' and lucky Feifei is around to explain what that means. Watch this programme to find out more.

Transcript (from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/...)
Feifei
Welcome to The English We Speak, I'm Feifei...

Rob
And I'm Rob. Quick Feifei, shut that door.

Feifei
OK, calm down Rob, what's the problem?

Rob
Well there's something going on in the office – everyone's shouting and arguing about who broke the computer – you know, the new one with all that fancy software on it.

Feifei
Oh yes, that really expensive one. So you've run away from the situation – that makes you look very guilty.

Rob
That's true – but the problem is, I am guilty. But the boss seemed so angry, I thought it best to… well… sort of…

Feifei
Do a runner!

Rob
If you mean to leave a place in order to avoid a difficult or unpleasant situation – then I suppose you're right.

Feifei
I am!

Rob
Oh no, is someone coming? I'll just hide under the desk while we hear some examples of this phrase in action…

Examples
The new trainee did a runner after the first day – I don't think he could cope with the high-pressure environment.

When they started to blame me for the mistake, I felt it best to do a runner and keep out of the way.

Feifei
So that's the phrase, to do a runner, which means leave a place quickly in order to avoid a difficult or unpleasant situation. But Rob, this phrase has another similar meaning too?

Rob
Yes. You can 'do a runner' from a place to avoid paying for something.

Feifei
Like a restaurant. Have you done that Rob?

Rob
Of course not! You know how honest I am.

Feifei
Honest? Is that why you are hiding in this studio, rather than admit you broke the new computer?

Rob
Well, it was an accident. Oh no... the boss is heading straight for the studio. I had better dash… see ya.

Feifei
Bye Rob. It looks like he's done a runner... again. Bye.

Talk about lying to children in 6 minutes


source: BBC Learning English             2018年4月19日
Listen to a discussion about the lies that parents tell children and whether that's a good or bad thing - and learn some useful vocabulary too.

# materials below: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/feat...
This week's question:
According to a study by a US psychologist, what percentage of people will lie in a typical ten minute conversation?
Is it:
a)    40%
b)    50%, or
c)    60%?
Listen to the programme to find out the answer.

Vocabulary:
a white lie: a lie we tell without meaning to hurt someone
distortion of the truth: changing or bending of the truth
malicious intent: doing something deliberately to be cruel or to hurt someone.
societal norm: accepted or ‘normal’ way something is done in society

Transcript
(Note: This is not a word for word transcript)

Neil
Hello welcome to 6 Minute English. I'm Neil.

Rob
And I'm Rob.

Neil
Rob, when you were a child, did you have a pet?

Rob
Yes, we had a few pets. My favourite was a little fluffy hamster.

Neil
And what happened to your hamster?

Rob
Well one day I got home from school and he wasn’t in his cage. I was worried for a bit in case he’d escaped or got hurt, but it was alright. My mum told me that he had gone to live on a farm so that he could run around with other animals.

Neil
Really?

Rob
Yes, really.

Neil
A hamster. Went to live on a farm. To be with other animals. Really?

Rob
Oh, well, when you put it like that.

Neil
I think that was probably one of those lies that parents tell their children so as not to make them sad.

Rob
Well I’m sad now

Neil
Well maybe having a go at this quiz will cheer you up. According to a study by a US psychologist, what percentage of people will lie in a typical ten minute conversation?
Is it:
a)    40%
b)    50%, or
c)    60%?

Rob
I think most people don’t lie that much, so I’ll say 40%.

Neil
We’ll reveal the answer a little later in the programme.

Rob
So today we are talking about lies and particularly the lies that parents tell children.

Neil
The topic was discussed on the BBC Radio 4 programme, Woman’s Hour.

Rob
A guest on that programme was Doctor Chris Boyle, a psychologist at Exeter University. He talks about a particular kind of lie. We tell these lies not because we want to hurt people. What colour are these lies called?

Dr Chris Boyle
A white lie is just a distortion of the truth without malicious intent – as long as there's not malicious intent I think it's something that we do. It's almost a societal norm that it's become where it is acceptable that we do tell certain lies at certain times.

Neil
Dr Chris Boyle there. What colour is the kind of lie he was talking about?

Rob
A white lie. He says a white lie is just a distortion of the truth. Distortion here means a changing or bending of the truth. These kind of lies are OK as long as we don’t tell them because we want to hurt someone.

Neil
He used the phrase malicious intent to talk about a bad reason for doing something, didn’t he?

Rob
Yes, intent is the reason or purpose for doing something and malicious is an adjective which means cruel or nasty. So without malicious intent means without wanting to hurt or be cruel to someone.

Neil
He said that this kind of white lie was almost a societal norm. Can you explain what he means by that?

Rob
Yes, something that is the norm is something that is expected, it’s regular and usual.The adjective societal comes from the noun society. So a societal norm is something that is regular and common in your culture or society.

Neil
So do you think your mum’s story about the hamster and the farm was a little white lie?

Rob
Yes, I’m sure it was. She didn’t do it with malicious intent - she didn’t want to hurt me. In fact, just the opposite, she wanted to protect me.

Neil
Yes, that’s one kind of white lie that parents tell, to protect children. There are also a couple of other reasons. One being the parent’s convenience.

Rob
Yes, I remember my mum telling me on certain days, the park wasn’t open. I know now that it never closed, I guess at the time she was just too busy to take me.

Neil
And then there are the cultural lies that parents tell children.

Rob
What do you mean by that?

Neil
Well first, if you have any children listening to this right now, you might want to cover their ears for a few seconds. RobI’m talking about, for example, Father Christmas and the Tooth Fairy.

Rob
Yes, there’s no malicious intent in telling children those stories. It is a cultural and societal norm.

Neil
Let’s listen to Dr Chris Boyle again talking about white lies.

Dr Chris Boyle
A white lie is just a distortion of the truth without malicious intent – as long as there's not malicious intent I think it's something that we do. It's almost a societal norm that it's become where it is acceptable that we do tell certain lies at certain times.

Neil
So now back to our question at the top of the programme. I asked what percentage of people will lie in a typical ten minute conversation. Was it:
a)    40%
b)    50%, or
c)    60%

What did you say Rob?

Rob
I said a) just 40%.

Neil
Well I'm afraid the answer was 60%.

Rob
Really? Goodness 60%! That's more than I expected.

Neil
Right, well before we go, let’s recap the vocabulary we talked about today. The first expression was 'white lie'. A lie we tell without meaning to hurt someone, for example when I say to you – you look nice today!

Rob
Wait, what did you say?

Neil
But that is actually a distortion of the truth. A changing or bending of the truth.

Rob
Mmmm. This makes me think of the next expression, 'malicious intent'. Intent is the reason or purpose for doing something, and doing something with a malicious intent is doing it deliberately to be cruel or to hurt someone. I think you have a malicious intent, telling me that when you say I look nice, it’s just a lie!

Neil
I’m just kidding!

Rob
That’s the norm for you, isn’t it, just kidding. A 'norm' is the standard or ‘normal’ way that something is. In the clip we heard 'societal norm' whichis the accepted or ‘normal’ way something is done in society.

Neil
For example, telling children about Father Christmas.

Rob
Sssh! But yes you're right.

Neil
Well, sadly this isn’t a lie but that's all for this programme. For more, find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and our YouTube pages, and of course our website bbclearningenglish.com where you can find all kinds of other audio programmes, videos, and quizzes, to help you improve your English. Thanks for joining us and goodbye!

Rob
Bye.

English @ the Movies: 'Even The Playing Field'


source: VOA Learning English              2018年4月6日

News Words: Expulsion


source: VOA Learning English          2018年4月5日
Expulsion is a severe measure, often meant as a punishment.

5 Essential Tips to Help You Learn English


source: Interactive English        2017年7月18日

Thanksgiving Traditions In The USA


source: Speak English with Christina        2015年11月22日

Phrasal Verbs about: Love, Romance, & Dating from start...to finish.


source: Gerry English Expressions        2016年2月3日

Wedding Customs


source: JenniferESL        2013年8月5日

BBC News Review: Tourists' carbon footprint 3 times worse


source: BBC Learning English          2018年5月8日
The story
A new study says tourism accounts for 8% of global carbon emissions – about three times more than previously estimated.
The report, published in the journal Nature, includes details on the carbon footprint linked to tourists' food, shopping and accommodation as well as their travel.

Key words and phrases: 
--choking: stopping from breathing
• It looked like he was choking. Probably because he was eating too fast.
• Throughout the holiday, the roads were choked with cars.
--globetrotting: travelling frequently worldwide
• The globetrotting basketball team became internationally renowned.
• Globetrotting is a great life, but it’s hard to start a family.
--cost the earth: be very expensive
• It’s a beautiful dress, but it costs the earth. I certainly can’t afford it.
• The wedding cost them the earth, but you can’t put a price on love.

Language challenge: 
The amount of carbon a person generates is their carbon ______
a) handprint
b) footprint
c) faceprint

# materials above: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english...

1 Simple Spelling Tip | Improve Your English Writing Skills


source: mmmEnglish       2018年4月5日
There are not many simple English spelling rules available to help you improve your writing and spelling skills.... But this one has helped me (and lots of native English speakers) throughout their lives.
In this lesson, I'll share a simple English spelling tip that will help you to write more confidently in English: i before e, except after c

Learn English with Friends: Flirting with Police


source: Learn English With TV Series         2016年6月17日

English Modals: 4 ways to use "SHOULD"


source: Learn English with Alex [engVid]       2018年4月13日
Most people only use "should" for advice. However, did you know that you can also use it to talk about your expectations and past regrets? Not only that, but you can even use it to make your statements less certain. Learn to use should for MORE than just advice, and master this common and useful English modal verb.

5 Simple & Easy tricks to Speak Fluent English Faster?


source: Learn English with Let's Talk         2018年4月17日
You are looking to speak fluent English faster, improve your pronunciation and speak like a native English speaker. You have tried every tip and trick in the book to improve your English fluency without achieving any major success. Maybe you are doing things the wrong way. Here are 5 simple and easy tips to speak fluent English faster and better in no time. Niharika, your English trainer has shortlisted some easy to implement English learning methods that would help you to learn English faster and make you a pro at speaking English. Learn tips to improve your English pronunciation, learning real conversation phrases and how to find native speakers to practice English. We hope this English lesson will take your English to a level you have always imagined.

5 Tips To Become a Confident English Speaker! Ask Alisha


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com       2018年4月14日
In this video, Alisha answers 5 questions.
- I dont understand english, I wanna learn but i dont know how to start?
- Do you have any ideas on how to improve speaking skills in English?
- I want a plan to speak English fluently.
- Can I practice listening to English using YouTube videos, for example?
- Do you think it's easier to understand the British accent or the American accent?

Conversation Practice: Travel (14 Questions & Answers) - 60 Dai...


source: Helena Daily English       2018年5月1日
English Speaking Conversation Practice (14 Questions & Answers) - 60 Daily Topics - S1.
Travelling to some places you’re interested in? I’m sure you did, wandering on the coaches to enjoy the beautiful scene in your hometown or take your bag to other famous places like France with Eiffel Tower or Mount Fuj in Japan...so on
Lets take a flight with me

Learn to talk about microadventures in 6 minutes!


source: BBC Learning English          2018年3月22日
Join us for six minutes of adventure! You won't be going far but you'll discover how adventurer, Alastair Humphreys thinks there's fun to be had on your doorstep. Along the way we'll be exploring the expeditions you could go on and new items of vocabulary to take with you!

# materials below: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/feat...
This week's question:
How far it is around the world measured at the equator – in other worlds the circumference? It is approximately…
a) 30,000 km
b) 40,000 km, or
c) 50,000 km
Listen to the programme to find out the answer.

Vocabulary:
wanderlust: a strong desire to travel
a sense of adventure: the feeling of doing a new, exciting and sometimes dangerous activity
to coin: used a word or phrase that no one has used before
hunch: an idea you have based on feelings but with no proof
charm: part of the pleasure or enjoyment of something
on your doorstep: close to where you live

Transcript: 
(Note: This is not a word for word transcript)

Rob
Hello I'm Rob and welcome to 6 Minute English– the show that brings you an interesting topic and authentic listening practice…

Neil
...and don't forget vocabulary to help you improve your language skills. I'm Neil by the way and today we're off on an adventure.

Rob
But not a very big adventure Neil – it's just a mini or microadventure – but if you have wanderlust – a strong desire to travel – I think it may appeal.

Neil
It will appeal to you Rob because you love to travel – haven't you circumnavigated the globe – I mean go all the way round the world?

Rob
Almost Neil – but today's mini-adventure doesn't involve travelling too far from home. We'll explore the topic more in a moment but not before we've set today's quiz question. So Neil do you know how far it is around the world measured at the equator – in other worlds the circumference? It is approximately…
a) 30,000 km
b) 40,000 km, or
c) 50,000 km

Neil
Well, I haven't walked it but I know it's a long way – so I'll go for c) 50,000 km.

Rob
I shall keep you in suspense and tell you the answer at the end of the programme. Our topic for discussion won't be travelling so far – it's about a new trend for small adventures.

Neil
What you mean are shorter breaks, closer to home. They're less expensive of course but also instil a sense of adventure – that's the feeling of doing a new, exciting and sometimes dangerous activity.

Rob
Well, adventurer, Alastair Humphreys has coined the phrase 'microadventures' to describe this. 'To coin' here means to use a word or phrase that no one has used before.

Neil
Now he's someone who goes on big trips and expeditions to the four corners of the globe and writing books about his adventures. But he wanted to prove you don't have to go far to find adventure.

Rob
Let's hear from him now – speaking on BBC Radio 4's You and Yours programme – about what he did. How did he describe his first microadventure?

Alastair Humphreys, adventurer
I'd been doing big adventures for years and I had this hunch that you didn't need to go to the ends of the world to have some sort of adventure. You didn't need to be in beautiful Patagonia to have the spirit of adventure. So I decided to try and prove my theory by doing the most boring, ugly adventure I could think of. And I came up with the idea of walking a lap of the M25 in the snow in January. And time and again as I walked round the M25 I just kept thinking to myself this experience is exactly the same as the four years I spent cycling round the world. Smaller, of course, a bit silly, but definitely felt like an adventure And that's when I really started to come up with the idea of microadventures.

Neil
So a microadventure is a boring, ugly adventure?

Rob
No Neil. It may not be glamourous but it is an adventure. He walked around the London orbital motorway – called the M25 – to prove his hunch that you don't need to go far to find adventure. A hunch is an idea you have based on feelings but there's no proof.

Neil
Well his hunch was right. But walking alongside a motorway isn't my idea of adventure.

Rob
It doesn't have to be Neil. Just getting out on your bike and exploring somewhere in your locality that you haven't visited before is an adventure. And how about camping?

Neil
Ah yes, I do like to camp out – that's a phrasal verb to mean sleep outside in a tent. You can be so close to nature and breathe in the fresh air.

Rob
Yep and you don't need to go far for a camping adventure – and being out a night really adds to the sense of adventure. That's what Alastair Humphreys believes…

Alastair Humphreys, adventurer
We humans are so boring these days – we so rarely spend time out in the darkness to see the stars and to see how the world feels different by night. I get a little bit nervous still – I still imagine ghosts – but that's part of the charm of making a little frisson of adventure. And then in the morning the sun comes up, the birds sing, jump in a river, back on the bus, back to your desk for 9.00.

Rob
Seeing how the world feels at night is a nice idea. Getting a bit nervous – anxious maybe – is part of the pleasure or enjoyment – what Alastair calls 'charm'.

Neil
I agree – and he used another word 'frisson' meaning a sudden, strong feeling of excitement, or fear.

Rob
My biggest fear would be returning to my desk for 9.00! But Alastair is right, there is an adventure to be had on your doorstep – that means close to where you live.

Neil
But only a small adventure Rob! Unlike an adventure round the circumference of the Earth.

Rob
Yes that was my question earlier: how far it is around the world measured at the equator – in other worlds the circumference? It is approximately…
a)    30,000 km
b)    40,000 km, or
c)    50,000 km

Neil
I said c) 50,000 km.

Rob
Sorry Neil – too far. The Earth's circumference has been calculated to be 40,075km. To travel that distance would be a major adventure.

Neil
OK, I think we should remind ourselves of the some of the words and phrases we've discussed today – starting with wanderlust – a strong desire to travel. "Rob has wanderlust, he's never at home!"

Rob
That's because I have a sense of adventure. That's the feeling of doing a new, exciting and sometimes dangerous activity. "Neil has no sense of adventure because he likes his holidays to be planned out with no surprises!"

Neil
That's a little unfair Rob – I just like to be 'holiday happy' – that's a term I've just coined, which means used a word or phrase that no one has used before. You can also say 'to coin a phrase' after using an expression that is well known and possibly used too much.

Rob
Next we heard hunch – that's an idea you have based on feelings but there's no proof. "I have a hunch Neil wants to go to the pub – he's packing his bag!"

Neil
Your hunch is correct Rob. But not before we recap our next word charm – that's part of the pleasure or enjoyment of something. "Part of the charm of going to the seaside is eating ice cream and walking down the pier."

Rob
And finally we heard on your doorstep - that means close to where you live. "There's a pub right on your doorstep, so why don't you make the most of it!"

Neil
I intend to Rob but first let me to remind you that you can learn English with us at bbclearningenglish.com. That's it for today's 6 Minute English. We hope you enjoyed it. Bye for now.

Rob
Bye.

English @ the Movies: 'Cut It Out'


source: VOA Learning English      2018年3月30日

News Words: Blockchain


source: VOA Learning English                  2018年3月29日
Blockchain is a new word that describes accounting technology. Learn what it is with News Words.

Greet People Like a Native Speaker | Pronunciation Lesson


source: Interactive English          2017年7月15日
Do you want to say words & phrases just like a native speaker would? If so, then it's important to master the pronunciation of the first words you often say to people...GREETINGS!
In this lesson, we go over several common greetings in English and tell you how to say them just like a native English speaker. We'll look at how the words sound, the different reductions, as well as word omissions when it comes to greeting people.
Before you can start a conversation, make sure you at least know how to give people the perfect greeting. :)

Does your intonation sound rude or polite?


source: Speak English with Christina       2015年11月15日

Collocations and Phrasal Verbs w/ 'COME'


source: Gerry English Expressions          2016年1月30日

CNN 10 - May 11, 2018 | Iran and Israel appear to exchange fire in the Middle East


source: NEWS with Subtitles     2018年5月10日
A new exchange of fire between old enemies threatens to affect regional stability in the Middle East. The date is set for a historic meeting between two rival leaders on opposite sides of the Pacific. And a grandfather in southern Asia proves that the love of learning is a lifelong experience.
NOTHER SPECIAL CHANNEL by CARL AZUZ: https://goo.gl/Uc8P1X
PRESS the SUBTITLE icon (CC) to display ENGLISH SUBTITLES.

English listening quiz - Understand NUMBERS


source: Crown Academy of English     2018年4月17日
This English listening exercise will test your understanding of numbers. There are 10 questions and it will help you prepare for listening exams such as the IELTS and the TOEFL.

6 Pronunciations of -ough


source: Speak English with Christina       2018年4月17日
Pronounce words like though, tough, and thought correctly and have more confidence when speaking English
HERE'S WHAT YOU'LL LEARN 1. -ough as /oh/, in words like "dough" 2. -ough as /ow/, in words like "drought" 3. -ough as /ew/, in words like "through"
4. -ough as /aw/, in words like "thought"
5. -ough as /off/, in words like "cough" 6. -ough as /uff/, in words like "tough"

The Simple Ways to Find Happiness | Happiness Life


source: Helena Daily English       2018年4月19日
We all want to be happy. It’s certainly what I spend most of my time pondering. Did a new car do it for me? Nope. A new wardrobe? Nope. It’s hard work to find happiness buddy. Seek happiness, and you shall eventually find it.
Here are 10 steps you can take to increase your feeling of great happiness and bring more happiness into your life:

Live London TOUR! (With Aly)


source: Learn English with Papa Teach Me        2018年4月15日

Active Voice and Passive Voice - Learn English Grammar


source: Learn English with EnglishClass101.com      2018年4月13日
In this English grammar lesson you will learn everything you need to know about active voice and passive voice, and how to convert active voice to passive voice easily. With this video you will be able to able to improve your English grammar. Are you ready to avoid doing common English mistakes?

How to disagree with people


source: BBC Learning English         2018年1月8日
Do you want to learn how to speak English? Then join us here on YouTube for great grammar, drama, news, study, pronunciation, vocabulary, music, interviews and celebrity videos. Every day we have a new video to help you with English. We also produce regular 'extra' videos across the week so come back every day to see what's new.

Is the internet good or bad?--Learn how to talk about the World Wide Web in 6 minutes


source: BBC Learning English           2018年4月26日
These days we take the internet for granted. We share our lives on social media and not just with friends and family. And that isn’t always a positive thing according to the father of the internet, Tim Berners-Lee. Listen to this discussion about whether the internet is a good or bad thing - and learn some useful vocabulary too.

# materials below: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/fea...
This week's question:
When did Berners-Lee first suggest the idea for what would become the World Wide Web? Was it in...
a)    1985
b)    1989
c)    1991
Listen to the programme to find out the answer.

Vocabulary
initially: at first - in the beginning
neutral: not controlling / not taking any action to control
anonymity: the state of having a hidden identity or personality
ameliorate: make a situation better
to tweak: to make a small change
kudos: praise and appreciation for something someone has done

Transcript
(Note: This is not a word for word transcript)

Rob
Hello welcome to 6 Minute English. I'm Rob.

Neil
And I'm Neil.

Rob
Can you remember the first time you ever used the World Wide Web or as we often call it, the internet, and what you used it for?

Neil
Oh that's a good question. I do remember. And nothing really changes does it? Because I looked up pictures of cats!

Rob
Cats! Very useful, anyway do you think the internet has generally been positive or negative for the world?

Neil
Wow, that's a big question. A huge question. I don't know if I can answer that.

Rob
Well one person who perhaps can answer it, is the man who invented it: British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. We'll find out what he thinks has become of his 'child' shortly but before that, a question for you all. When did Berners-Lee first suggest the idea for what would become the World Wide Web? Was it in...
a) 1985
b) 1989
c) 1991

Neil
Tricky but I think it's earlier than people think so I'm going to go for 1985.

Rob
Well that was a long time ago but we'll reveal the answer a little later in the programme. I think it's true to say that the internet has been one of, if not the most important technological developments perhaps of all time. Would you agree Neil?

Neil
Well it's hard to imagine living without it. Not impossible, but not nearly as convenient.

Rob
These days we take the internet for granted. We share our lives on social media and not just with friends and family. And that isn't always a positive thing according to the father of the internet, Tim Berners-Lee. In a recent BBC Tech Tent programme he talked about his concerns with the internet and particularly the companies that control its information. Companies which he calls 'internet giants'. What does he say he thought these companies had to do?

Tim Berners-Lee
Initially I felt the main thing an internet giant had to do was just to be neutral, just be a platform and humanity, once connected by technology, will do wonderful things. And clearly it doesn't work like that. If you connect humanity via Wikipedia then they do produce, in general, wonderful things. If you connect people by social network where they have anonymity, then it can bring out the very nastiest of people.

Rob
So what did he say he thought these internet giants had to do?

Neil
He said that he thought initially, that they just had to be neutral. Initially means 'at first', 'in the beginning' and it also suggests that later he changed his mind. Anyway, he said that he thought they just had to be neutral. Neutral here means that they didn't need to do anything, they didn't need to control the internet or information. He thought it would be a tool to connect people and ideas and information and it would be wonderful.

Rob
But it's not all good, is it?

Neil
No. He does say that giving people access to sources of information is generally a good thing but that when it comes to social networks, social media, people have anonymity.

Rob
Anonymity?

Neil
Yes. It means that on the internet people can hide their true identity or personality. Some people write things that they would never say to someone in person because they think there will be no consequences. Berners-Lee says anonymity can bring out the nastiest side of people. People saying horrible and terrible things to each other.

Rob
Berners-Lee does have some suggestions for how this could be changed. And it's based on the idea of likes and shares, which he calls kudos. What's his suggestion?

Tim Berners-Lee
The different social networks and different platforms are in different situations and in some cases they have acknowledged there is an issue. I think they realise that the issue could be hugely ameliorated by tweaking the way the thing works by changing the way retweets are propagated or changing the way people get kudos - give them more kudos for being constructive for example.

Rob
So how does he think companies could address the problem?

Neil
Well, he says that some of the social networks have agreed that there is a problem and they know what could improve it.

Rob
He didn't use the word improve though, did he?

Neil
No he actually used the rather formal verb ameliorate, which means 'to improve or make something better'.

Rob
So how does he suggest the problem could be ameliorated?

Neil
By tweaking the way in which people give or receive kudos. Tweaking means 'making a small change to the way something works'. Much of what happens on the internet is driven by our desire to get likes and shares – this is the kudos that Berners-Lee talks about. He feels that tweaking this could lead to a better experience. For example, getting more kudos for constructive or positive actions.

Rob
Mmm, interesting – but I wonder who would decide if something is constructive?

Neil
Well that's another big question for another day, I guess.

Rob
For now though, let's have the answer to our small question. In what year did Berners-Lee present the idea for what would become the World Wide Web? The options were a) 1985, b)1989 or c) 1991. It was infact 1989. Now before we go let's have a quick recap of today's vocabulary.

Neil
Initially – means 'at first - in the beginning'. Then we had neutral.

Rob
In this case it meant 'not controlling' or 'not taking any action to control'.

Neil
Then there was the noun anonymity which is the state of having a hidden identity or personality.

Rob
Next, to ameliorate a situation is to make it better.

Neil
To tweak something is to make a small change to the way something works.

Rob
And then we had kudos. Kudos is praise and appreciation for something you've done.

Neil
Well kudos to you Rob for today's programme. Thank you very much.

Rob
Well, thank you Neil and thank you everyone for listening. That's all we have today but you can, find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, and of course our website bbclearningenglish.com! Bye for now.

Neil
Thanks for joining us and goodbye.

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source: BBC Learning English     2018年3月15日
How do you learn to speak a language?
Many scientists believe that knowledge of another language can boost your brainpower – so what are we waiting for – we should all be learning another language. But that's easier said than done as acquiring this new skill can be hard. 6 Minute English looks at the reasons for learning a new language and hears from an expert who has a tip for making it easier.

# materials below: from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/feat...
This week's question:
Approximately how many languages there are in the world altogether? Are there…
a)     70
b)    700
c)    7,000
Listen to the programme to find out the answer.

Vocabulary
master: learn thoroughly or learn well
fluent: speak well and without difficulty.
frequency: how often something occurs
inflections: changes to the basic form of words to show changes to the way they are used in a sentence
lemma: the simplest form or base form of a word

Transcript
(Note: This is not a word for word transcript)

Rob
Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English– the show that brings you an interesting topic, authentic listening practice and vocabulary to help you improve your language skills. I'm Rob…

Neil
Watashi no namae wa Neil desu. And that means 'my name's Neil'.

Rob
So Neil, here's a question for you – can you speak any languages other than English of course? I think you can!

Neil
Un poco de español  that means a little bit of Spanish. Some Japanese, which I tried at the beginning and also a bit of Czech language - Dobrý den, jak se máš?

Rob
Very impressive. So what tips can you give for learning to speak another language?

Neil
Well, practise, practise, practise – and don't be afraid of making mistakes as I no doubt have.

Rob
Of course. Well my aim this year is to master the Spanish language. Master means to learn thoroughly.

Neil
Muy bien! Well you're not alone. A survey by the British Council found learning a language is a new year's resolution for about one in five Britons in 2018. So learning Spanish is a good start Rob but do you know approximately how many languages there are in the world altogether? Are there…
a)    70
b)    700
c)    7,000

Rob
Well I know there are many but surely not 7,000 so I'm going to say b) 700 – but don't expect me to learn all of them.

Neil
I won't Rob. But I will give you the answer later. So, we all know learning another language is a good thing – it brings us many benefits.

Rob
Yes, we can communicate with people from other countries and when we're travelling we can understand what signs and notices say. So we don't get lost.

Neil
That's right – but many scientists also believe that knowledge of another language can boost your brainpower. A study of monolingual and bilingual speakers suggests speaking two languages can help slow down the brain's decline with age.

Rob
All good reasons. But Neil, learning another language is hard. It would take me years and years to become fluent in say, Mandarin – by fluent I mean speak very well, without difficulty.

Neil
Well this depends on your mother tongue. In general, the closer the second language is to the learner's native tongue and culture in terms of vocabulary, sounds or sentence structure - the easier it will be to learn.

Rob
But whatever the language, there is so much vocabulary to learn – you know, thousands and thousands of words.

Neil
Maybe not Rob. Professor Stuart Webb, a linguist from the University of Western Ontario, may be able to help you. He spoke to BBC Radio 4's More or Less programme and explained that you don't need to do that…

Professor Stuart Webb, linguist, University of Western Ontario
For language learners in a foreign language setting – so for example if you were learning French in Britain or English in Japan, students may often really struggle to learn more than 2,000, 3,000 words after many years of study. So for example, there was study in Taiwan recently that showed that after nine years of study about half of the students had still failed to learn the most frequent 1,000 words. Now they knew lower frequency words but they hadn't mastered those most important words.

Neil
So Rob, don't waste your time trying to learn every single word. Professor Webb spoke there about research that showed students knew lower frequency words but weren't learning enough high frequency words.

Rob
Right, and frequency here means the number of times something happens – so the important words to learn are the high frequency ones – and how many are there exactly?

Neil
Here's Professor Stuart Webb again…

Professor Stuart Webb, linguist, University of Western Ontario
For example, with English, I would suggest if you learn the 800 most frequent lemmas – which is a word and its inflections – that will account for about 75 per cent of all of the English language. So that learning those 800 words first will provide the foundation for which you may be able to learn the lower frequency words.

Rob
Fascinating stuff. And good to know I just need to learn about 800 words – or what he calls lemmas.

Neil
Yes a lemma is the simplest form or base form of a word. And the inflection here refers to how the base word is changed according to its use in a sentence. Knowing these things give you a foundation – the basics from which you language learning will develop. Simple

Rob
Thank goodness I am learning just one new language!

Neil
But how many languages could you potentially be learning Rob? Earlier I asked you, approximately how many languages there are in the world altogether? Are there…
a)    70
b)    700
c)    7,000

Rob
And I said 700. Was I right?

Neil
No Rob, you were wrong. There are around 7,000 recognised languages in the world but UNESCO has identified 2,500 languages which it claims are at risk of extinction.

Rob
A sobering thought Neil. Now shall we remind ourselves of some of the English vocabulary we've heard today. Starting with master.

Neil
To master a new skill, in this context, means to learn thoroughly or learn well. "Rob hopes to master Spanish before he starts a new job in Madrid."

Rob
That's news to me Neil! But it would be good to be fluent in Spanish – or any language – or to speak it fluently – that's speaking it well and without difficulty.

Neil
Now our next word was frequency.  Here we are referring to high and low frequency words – so it means how often they occur. Examples of a high frequency word are 'it', 'the' and 'and'.

Rob
And our next word is inflections. These are the changes to the basic form of words according to their function in a sentence. Such as adding an 's' to the end of a word to make it plural.

Neil
And don't forget lemma which is the simplest form or base form of a word before an inflection is added.

Rob
And finally foundation which means the basics your learning grows from.

Neil
That just leaves me to remind you that you can learn English with us at bbclearningenglish.com. That's it for today's 6 Minute English. We hope you enjoyed it. Bye for now. Na shledanou. Hasta luego. Ja-ne.

Rob
And in English, goodbye.

Neil
Goodbye.